15 February, 2012

Hoar frost

Jack Frost displaying his artistic talents. Very cold weather with clear skies and no wind allows lovely feathery hoar frost crystals to grow on surfaces exposed to the air, such as plant stems.


Hoar frost on plant stems at the base of a hedge...


... and on an isolated plant at a field edge


Close-up of feathery ice crystals.

9 comments:

Gabriele C. said...

Oh, those are pretty.

Gabriele C. said...

Oh, those are pretty!

Carla said...

They are pretty, aren't they? It's rare to see so many crystals, so large and so well shaped. I guess it was because the temperature was unusually low - even the estuary, which is tidal so a mix of salt and fresh water, was frozen in places, and that doesn't happen very often.

Meghan said...

I love that last picture. Sooo pretty!

Rick said...

Very pretty! But boy does it look cold.

I think I mentioned this during an earlier winter, that for some reason I don't associate snow with England.

Captcha is suddenly much tougher. Presumably the spambots are (alas!) getting smarter and harder to block.

Carla said...

Meghan - yes, they were very pretty. Glad you like the picture!

Rick - yes, it was cold, about 8 degrees (Centigrade) below freezing. If a high pressure system forms in the right place, it can draw cold air down from the Arctic or across from Siberia, and that can drop a sizeable amount of snow on England, particularly in the north and east.

Constance Brewer said...

Like the feathery crystals - from the warmth of my house.

Kathryn Warner said...

What gorgeous pictures!

Carla said...

Constance, Kathryn - thank you. All gone now the weather has warmed up.