18 February, 2009

Interview on BBC Radio Suffolk

I talked to Georgina Wroe on BBC Radio Suffolk about Paths of Exile and Anglo-Saxon England on Tuesday 17 February. You can listen to the interview by playing the video below.

12 comments:

nicola said...

Nice interview. I hope you sell a zillion books.

I was struck by your comment about having to choose when it came to 'O' levels. That happened to me, too. (I also chose science.)

I also really liked your reference to Hild. And I absolutely relate to taking a whole volume to cover only a year or so of an eleven-year story.

I'm looking forward to reading Paths of Exile.

Alianore said...

I can't hear the interview, unfortunately. :( (Stupid computers!) But I echo Nicola's comment and hope you sell a zillion copies of Paths of Exile!

Carla said...

Nicola - thank you! That's really interesting that you were faced with the same choice. Where do you suppose the idea came from that history/humanities and science are somehow mutually exclusive? CP Snow, maybe? Or before him. I often get surprised looks when I say I'm interested in both, but to me it doesn't seem surprising at all.
Hild was such an important figure in Anglo-Saxon England that I had to mention her somewhere, although Paths of Exile is set a generation before her time. Her father is a secondary character in the novel (if you read it, you'll have no trouble spotting him!).

Alianore - that's odd. Maybe there's a glitch with the iPlayer. (Unless your computer has set itself to mute?) I'll have an audio file of the interview up here in a few days time, so you can try again then if you like.

Constance said...

Hey, neat! Thanks for the link. *off to listen*

Meghan said...

I like how confident and informed you are in this interview. I've only done a couple of podcasts and I always sound like a nervous wreck! Very interesting--can't wait to read PoE!

Carla said...

Constance - thanks!

Meghan - thanks, you're too kind! I may not have sounded like a nervous wreck, but I assure you I felt like one....

nicola said...

Carla, I certainly think Snow has a lot to answer for... But I think the divide originated in gender: girl subjects (arts/soft) and boy subjects (sciences/hard). Never the twain shall meet, blah blah blah.

I went to an all-girls school but the divide ran so deep that when (after the 'O' level debacle) I declared I'd be doing maths, chemistry, biology, general studies and English at 'A' level, there had to be a special meeting of staff. Tuh. And in the end I gave up maths after a year because we just couldn't make the schedule work. Double tuh.

Carla said...

Nicola - you may be right. I thought one of the advantages of all-girl schools was supposed to be a less rigid gender division, on the grounds that if they're going to teach maths and science at all they have to teach them to girls. Evidently not. It's a shame the timetable couldn't be made to work for you.

nicola said...

Eh, it was no big deal in the end. (Turns out I wasn't exactly Brain of Britain when it came to maths--way too erratic. Ah, well.)

And it was the English 'A' level that led me to Chaucer, to Middle English, to all things Old English, to... Ah, but you know where that leads :)

Carla said...

I do indeed know where that leads :-) I found my way to Beowulf and Bede without going via a formal English curriculum - which is probably just as well!

elena maria vidal said...

I thoroughly enjoyed the interview, Carla. It was excellent! Congratulations!

Carla said...

Thank you, Elena.