07 February, 2007

Village church with snowdrops



This looked so pretty in today's bright winter sunshine I thought I'd share it with you. The flint construction is very typical of East Anglian churches, as there's little or no decent building stone in the region. The snowdrops grow on the bank either side of the gateway into the churchyard. Later in the spring there will be celandines among them. There was a woodpecker drumming somewhere nearby (I never saw it, so I don't know which species it was), and the very first of the blackthorn flowers just opening in a sunny hedgerow.

9 comments:

Susan Higginbotham said...

Pretty!

Bernita said...

Oh, moan!
Cruel, Carla, cruel.
We are in deep mid-winter here.

Hazel-rah said...

In Australia we are in a drought, under water restrictions so severe you can only water your garden (and not with a hose) at set times twice a week. Everyone's garden is a dried yellow mess.

This looks pretty nice.

elena maria vidal said...

How beautiful. The pictures fill me with the hope of spring. It is a bitter, cruel winter here, too.

Daphne said...

What a pretty little church. Thanks for sharing!

Alianore said...

Lovely pics! How old is the church?

Carla said...

Thanks, everybody! It did look particularly pretty yesterday in glorious weather.

There's a church recorded in Domesday Book, but the present building is mostly 14th century, with a Norman doorway, a 15th-century tower and some Victorian additions and repairs.

Gabriele C. said...

I like those little village churches. We have some nice ones here, too.

Pretty flowers. But I miss the snow in Europe this winter.

Carla said...

I miss the snow in the sense that its absence is probably a worrying symptom of global warming, but in Britain we don't cope very well with snow so I'm not sorry that there hasn't been much of it so far this winter.