31 October, 2006

A rose by any other name.....

Sign seen outside a farm gate in Norfolk, UK:

Horse Muck - 50p
Equine Residue - £1.00
Poo de Chevaux - £2.00

Clearly a man who knows his market!

13 comments:

Margaret Evans Porter said...

Oh, this is grand!

wil said...

That's hilarious!

Anonymous said...

LOL!

Carla said...

It's great, isn't it? It made me laugh when I cycled past it, so I thought I'd share it with you all.

Bernita said...

~chortle~
He knows how to upscale a midden.

Rick said...

http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/003704.html

Carla said...

Indeed, Bernita. I'm surprised the last one wasn't priced in guineas.

Hello Rick, I was just thinking of you the other day and wondering how Catherine of Lyonesse was getting on. I saw that article on Language Log (great blog, isn't it?). Made me wonder if Chinese English would evolve into a recognisable dialect, like Indian English.

Anonymous said...

Lol, that reminds me of the menue of our universitiy dining hall; they always gave pretty - and misspelled - French names to ordinary German dishes.

Carla said...

What, like "Potage de Jean-Paul de tomate de can" when they mean tinned tomato soup? A certain sort of institutional catering does that over here, too. Why, by the way, is French considered aspirational? I'd half-wondered if it was some sort of hangover from the Norman Conquest here, but that can't apply to Germany, can it?
My partner's college dining room used to write the daily menu up on chalkboards, which the students in the queue duly amused themselves by altering. So "steak and kidney pie" would get amended to "snake and pigmy pie", and ratatouille would get "With Real Rat" appended, and so on. Hours of harmless fun :-)

Anonymous said...

I suppose it's the haute cuisine aspect that makes French look superior.

Ratatouille with Real Rats, lol.

Martyn said...

That's fantastic !

Carla said...

Gabriele - I was reminded yesterday that the college staff got fed up with amendments and replaced the chalkboards with moveable letters on a peg board. Which meant the students couldn't write on it any more, so they took to moving the letters around instead. How many scurrilous anagrams of 'ratatouille' can you come up with? (Spelling mistakes are allowed).

Martyn - Hello, and glad to see you're back blogging.

Anonymous said...

The staff should know better - students are always ahead. :p